While some trends among the car crowd will always be around and are well received by future generations, some things do not age like wine. They age like bread. Or milk.

In the 90s we had the "ricer revolution". Good parts and import tuners were difficult to find at the time so for every hardcore import car out tearing up the pavement there were a legion of "tuners" claiming to be the next John Force... while driving what used to be their mom's Accord. They all had the same type of setup- a compact import car with an air intake, cut coils, angle tipped exhaust and loads of stickers for parts (in many cases) they didn't even have. Sometimes there was poor window tint. The ones with a few bucks would pop for a nitrous system or a header. Mostly all show and no go they were easy to pick off in a drag race, but every now and then you'd be next to (what appeared to be) a beat up civic only to hear a turbo spool. Thankfully this trend died off when import parts became cheaper and good shops and information became plentiful.

In the 80s there was pro-street. Motorheads would tub out their car and do their best to make a street-legal drag car. There were (and still are) many successes, however there were a ton of awful failures. While people still build and race pro-street cars, the peak of the trend was years ago. Popularity with the younger crowd is light. People want to play around with road and rally cars and a ladder bar suspension doesn't lend well to that.

Which brings us to the 70s. Import cars were still new to much of the population and drag racing had taken the nation by storm. Much like their children would do in the 90s, people back in the 70s wanted to look like they were going fast even though their wallet and talent weren't always up to snuff. So out came the air shocks, extended shackles, and very wide tires that made the former two items a necessity. Hood scoops were added to cars with stock engines, and fake side pipes ran down the rocker panels. There were faux-lace trim kits, pipe organ speakers, opera windows, and a myriad of other things that are good for a chuckle when you disassemble that old Duster you dragged out of the woods.

Below is a partial listing of what you had access to before the Internet and touch tone phones. Before disco but after the days of the first generation of hardcore factory muscle (with a few exceptions, I'm looking at you Mr. SD-455). When compression ratios fell and the pellet cat was on the horizon like an squadron of enemy fighters. Most of this is pretty normal, but there's some wacky stuff here. A 10" lift kit for your leaf springs? That'll be $10 plus shipping.

Enjoy.

The Automotive Aftermarket 40 years ago

The Automotive Aftermarket 40 years ago

The Automotive Aftermarket 40 years ago

The Automotive Aftermarket 40 years ago

The Automotive Aftermarket 40 years ago

Thanks to Hemmings for the original posting at http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2014...